News Blogmaritime piracy

When pirates call European sailors to the rescue...

(BRUSSELS2) Imagine the scene. We are in the middle of the Indian Ocean. And the Maran Centaurus, a tanker weighing 300.000 tonnes, has been in the hands of pirates for almost two months. With 28 crew on board (including 9 Greeks and 1 Romanian). The outcome is near. The parties agreed on a ransom to be paid. $5,5 million which must notably be dropped on the deck of the ship by parachute dropped from a plane passing at low altitude. When… two pirate skiffs approach the tanker at high speed. The skiffs do not belong to the same gang as those on board. Shots are exchanged on both sides. One pirate died in the clashes (4 according to other sources). Only the ship is filled with fuel and any unfortunate action could cause an explosion. Goodbye then, ransom, fuel, boat and men… Neither one nor two. The Greek frigate, Salamis, which was nearby and observing the scene, was called to the rescue. She dispatches her two helicopters. The attackers flee... The field is clear. The ransom can be delivered. The tanker and the crew can be released... And who do we say thank you?

NB: to thank the crew for their "cooperation", the pirates would have returned part of the ransom: half a million $. A nice reward...

 

Nicolas Gros Verheyde

Chief editor of the B2 site. Graduated in European law from the University of Paris I Pantheon Sorbonne and listener to the 65th session of the IHEDN (Institut des Hautes Etudes de la Défense Nationale. Journalist since 1989, founded B2 - Bruxelles2 in 2008. EU/NATO correspondent in Brussels for Sud-Ouest (previously West-France and France-Soir).